Claudia Kemfert is currently Professor of Energy Economics and Sustainability at the Hertie School of Governance in Berlin since 2009 and Head of the department Energy, Transportation, Environment at the German Institute of Economic Research (DIW Berlin) since April 2004. Prior to this, from 2004 – 2009 Claudia was professor of environmental economics at Humboldt University Berlin.

Claudia’s research focuses on the economic assessment of climate and energy policy strategies. She has published numerous articles in high level scientific journals and has recently published two highly recognised books to illustrate the economic impacts of climate change and energy policy.

She has received an award from DAAD, was honoured in 2006 as top German Scientist from the German research foundation, Helmholtz and Leibniz Association, and in 2011 was awarded with the Urania Medaille and also the B.A.U.M. environmental award for best science.

Claudia has advised EU president José Manuel Barroso and acts as an external expert for the Intergovernmental Panel of Climate Change (IPCC). She is a member of the High Level Expert Group of the EU Commissioner for Environment and Sustainability and of the Advisory Group on Energy of the European Commission (DG Research) as well as a member of the Club of Rome. She furthermore acts as jury member for several significant sustainability prices.

Claudia studied economics at Oldenburg, Bielefeld (Germany) and Stanford University (USA). After completing her PhD in 1998, Claudia worked for the Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei (FEEM) (Italy) and Stuttgart University (Institute for Rational Energy Use). She gave lectures at the universities of St. Petersburg, Moscow and Siena. In 2000, she waas Associate Professor and headed a PhD research group at Oldenburg University. She was the first associate professor in Germany who got a tenured professor position. She is project manager of diverse research projects about environmental and energy policy strategies, and she is engaged in different networks like the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) at Stanford University.

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