After graduating from the University of Cape Town, Silver-Vallance pursued an international career in the Medical Technologies industry. He found success in developing complex partnerships between national healthcare providers and the most advanced Med Tech companies, all in the pursuit of revolutionising global healthcare.

The experiences that Silver-Vallance had as a paramedic in Cape Town during his time as a student stayed with him as he found himself entrenched in the corporate world. Memories of delivering injured children to Cape Town’s Red Cross Hospital, one of Africa’s only four dedicated paediatric facilities, penetrated the trappings of his significant corporate success.

Silver-Vallance has worked with some of the best minds on some of societies’ greatest healthcare challenges. This has led to implementing ground-breaking initiatives, including the development of innovative training methods in cardiac, vascular and plastic surgery. He also developed the vision for one of the world’s most revolutionary clinical studies (VIOLET), and built the strategy of how to form true partnerships between the private sector and Europe’s leading healthcare providers.

The Robben Island Balloon Run, whereby Silver-Vallance became the first person to float from Robben Island to Cape Town using only helium balloons, raised funds for the proposed Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital. It caught the imaginations of people across the world, and with coverage across 147 countries through the biggest global media outlets.

Along with Sir Ranulph Fiennes, Silver-Vallance and his team are now preparing to implement another project; The Long Walk will be the longest-ever underwater walk along the 5 miles of uncharted ocean floor from Robben Island to Cape Town’s Mainland. This impossible quest’s focus, in the short term, is to continue to drive funds and grow awareness for paediatric care in sub-Saharan Africa; whilst, over the longer term it aims to raise awareness that investing wisely in our natural environment will benefit future generations.

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